Steven F. Hayward

Steven F. Hayward teaches political science and law at UC Berkeley, where he is a fellow of the Institute of Governmental Studies. Mr. Hayward is the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy. Mr. Hayward is the author of the definitive two-volume biography of Ronald Reagan, "The Age of Reagan" and a member of BulgariaAnalytica's board of international advisers.
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  The biggest question facing all of Europe at the moment is whether Britain’s protracted exit from the European Union, which remained uncertain until late January, will be an isolated “one-off” phenomenon, or whether it will represent a turning point that will see the EU adjust its power and ambitions in significant ways — or even start to come apart completely. EU critics like Nigel Farage hope for the latter outcome, but the opposite is equally possible. Now that the restraining voice of Britain is gone, the larger European nations that dominate the EU — France, Germany, and their western European satellites — might move to increase the EU’s ambitions. This poses dilemmas for the smaller nations on the EU’s extended periphery, like Bulgaria.   Free trade and greater economic

This entry was posted in Bulgaria, Europe and tagged , , , by Steven F. Hayward.

About Steven F. Hayward

Steven F. Hayward teaches political science and law at UC Berkeley, where he is a fellow of the Institute of Governmental Studies. Mr. Hayward is the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy. Mr. Hayward is the author of the definitive two-volume biography of Ronald Reagan, "The Age of Reagan" and a member of BulgariaAnalytica's board of international advisers.
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breafing 29.06

The article first published in powerlineblog.com on 06/30/2017.   SOFIA, Bulgaria, June 30—What the heck, I may as well get my Rebecca West on and file an old-fashioned “foreign correspondent” story from the the Balkans, where I’m visiting for several days that have included a seminar for graduate students and young professionals at New Bulgarian University, and yesterday a “strategic briefing” for business and political leaders, about which more in a moment.   New Bulgarian University One of my favorite ledes from Whittaker Chambers during his years at National Review ran something like (I am doing this from memory), “Over in the capitals of the East—Vienna, Prague, Budapest, New York. . .” Heh. And just so. More recently my all time favorite provocation from Donald Rumsfeld was his implicitly anti-French and anti-German distinction

This entry was posted in Bulgaria, Europe by Steven F. Hayward.

About Steven F. Hayward

Steven F. Hayward teaches political science and law at UC Berkeley, where he is a fellow of the Institute of Governmental Studies. Mr. Hayward is the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy. Mr. Hayward is the author of the definitive two-volume biography of Ronald Reagan, "The Age of Reagan" and a member of BulgariaAnalytica's board of international advisers.
Views:8442
Photo: Wikimedia Commons/ Michael Vadon

  The most salient political aspect of Donald Trump’s nomination this week is this fact: the American people have never elected anyone whose first public service was the presidency. (I include generals — Dwight Eisenhower, Ulysses S. Grant — as having serious experience in public service before the presidency.) Only once before has one of the two major parties nominated a business leader with no prior experience in public office, with the GOP’s selection of utility executive Wendell Willkie in 1940.   Like Trump, Willkie had been a Democrat most of his life, and only converted to the Republican Party a year before seeking the GOP nomination. But there the parallels end. Unlike Trump, Willkie had a long track record of detailed public engagement on the issues of the 1930s