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The Roman public baths in Odessos

  Odessos was founded by Ionian Greek colonists from Miletus during the years 585–550 BC. The Greeks established their colony on the site of a Thracian settlement with the same name. Both Greeks and Thracians coexisted peacefully in the colony and in its vicinity, and there is strong evidence of bilateral trade relations and cultural interaction. Odessos was governed by the Boule (City Council) and Demos (Assembly). A monumental Doric temple was built during the second half of the 6th century BC. However, until the middle of the 4th century BC, Odessos remained a relatively small town, although its port was quite important for maintaining trade relations between the ancient Greeks and the Thracians. The first fortification wall was built around the middle of the 4th century BC, and the

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The Roman theater

  The earliest traces of human occupation in present-day Plovdiv date back to the Neolithic period in the 6th millennium BC. Later on, during the 1st millennium BC the area was occupied by the Thracians. According to some Greek sources, the name of the Thracian town that existed on that place was Eumolpia, after the name of Eumolpos, a mythical Thracian king. In 342 BC, the Thracian town was conquered by Philip of Macedon who reconstructed and enlarged the urban area, built monumental fortification walls, settled a Macedonian military garrison there and renamed the settlement to Philippopolis, or “the Town of Philip” in his own honor. The local Thracians called the town Pulpudeva, which was the Thracian translation of Philipopolis, a name later inherited by the Bulgars in the Early

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radoi ralin boris dimovski

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luti chushki

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The Thracian tomb at Sveshtari dated to c. 280 – 270 BC

  In September 1944 Bulgaria was occupied by the Soviet army, and subsequently a Communist dictatorship was established in the country. During the following decades several hundred thousand Bulgarians who were considered enemies of the Communist regime were expelled from their homes and resettled across the country, or sent to labor camps and prisons, and many of them died or were killed. The Communist ideology and total party control ruled not only the everyday life of the Bulgarian people, but also the science and humanities. Many outstanding achievements in  Bulgarian archaeology before World War II were neglected and even forbidden because of the Communist ideological control and censorship and the Soviet domination. The contacts with Western scholars and institutions were restricted and often forbidden, and only a few Bulgarian archaeologists

This entry was posted in Bulgarian culture by Nikola Theodossiev.

About Nikola Theodossiev

Dr. Nikola Theodossiev teaches archaeology at the Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski. He widely traveled in Europe and the U.S. and lectured in over a dozen of universities. Dr. Theodossiev is on the editorial board of the academic journal Ancient West & East and the e-journal Fasti Online.
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photo (28)_1

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Photo: lostbulgaria.com

Bulgarians and the British fought each other for the first time during the First World War. But in the war there was also time for relaxation in the frontline theatres. Writing about the theatres on the Balkan front, H. Collinson Owen, Official Correspondent in the Near East, emphasized the tolerance of the Bulgarians, who were just a shot away:   “All the Divisional theatres had the added spice that they were well within the enemy  artillery range – they were, in fact, the most advanced of any war theatres – and the programme contained instructions as to scattering  tactics  in case of bombardment. But the Bulgar hardly ever tried to shoot at them, and this was one of the things put down to his credit”   The Bulgarians at the

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Rafail Popov

  In the late 19th century, several local archaeological societies were founded in different Bulgarian towns and in 1901 the Bulgarian Archaeological Society was established, immediately becoming an important center of the archaeological studies that further strengthened the institutional backbone of the Bulgarian archaeology.   After the liberation from the Ottoman Empire, there was a significant interest in the mediaeval archaeology of the First and the Second Bulgarian Kingdoms, given that the new Principality of Bulgaria was considered as their political successor. Thus, in the 1880s archaeological excavations were carried out in Veliko Tarnovo, the last mediaeval Bulgarian capital, and in 1899 – 1900 excavations in Pliska, the first mediaeval Bulgarian capital, were launched by Karel Škorpil. In that period the interest of the foreign scholars in the Bulgarian archaeology

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pokemoni

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