putin trump

  The month of August in Russian politics brings a special mystic connotation. Even more so for President Putin’s rule – most of the major events, crashes, disasters, and political crises happen in August.   This August begins with President Trump’s signing of upgraded sanctions, which turned the Kremlin off balance.   The Cold War between the US and Russia is now officially open on both sides, as of August 1.   The mere fact that Putin deems necessary to turn up in person on Russia’s central TV channel to clarify his policy line on the new US sanctions means only one thing – the bets are the highest possible, this is personal and there is no place left for intermediaries and interpreters.   Some time ago, the Russian MFA


Donald Trump is now the president of the United States and it is already clear that this is the beginning of a new era in American and international politics. It is, as political scientists like to say, a paradigm change. Untangling where exactly the paradigm change lies may not seem possible only a couple of days after Trump assumed power, but the new president is nothing if not clear as to what he would like to do. Whether he would be able to do it is another question that would have to wait for an answer, but his intentions are clear. The most memorable line in his short inaugural address puts his main disagreement with the way things as follows: “For too long, a small group in our nation’s capital


  America is entering an unpredictable and potentially volatile new era. After his inauguration as US President on January 20, Donald Trump will face enormous domestic and foreign policy challenges following an election that has sharply divided the population and disturbed many of America’s allies.   The state that stands to gain the most from a Donald Trump presidency is Vladimir Putin’s Russia. But reality may not be all it appears, as political office does not always mirror election campaigns and actual policies may not reflect pledges trumpeted at rallies.   During the long election campaign Trump periodically praised President Vladimir Putin as a great leader, he described NATO as obsolete, and complained about the Allies, while some of his foreign policy advisors have maintained close business and personal links


US-Russian disagreements are not the only reason for the failure of the discussions on the Syrian crisis at the Security Council and within the International Syria Support Group, held in New York during the United Nations September session. Apart from these disagreements the conflict is complicated by the huge differences in the positions and behavior of local, regional and international forces which are involved one way or another. Accordingly, there are discrepancies in the practical steps and priorities included in their policies. As for the Russian-American contradictions, they have strategic military and political dimensions as they reflect well-established stereotypes in assessing the opponent. Washington considers Russia a regional, not a great power and emphatically places it in the hostile camp. For its part Moscow sees itself as a great power


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