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theresa may

  A quick snap analysis on the likely outcome of the UK’s National Security Council meeting, presided by British PM Theresa May, today regarding sanctions on Russia, leads to grim conclusion and more than a wartime rhetoric. This is probably the most evident proof of the weakened geopolitical posture of Britain following the Brexit. While NATO’s coordinated response – Britain can still invoke article 5 – is still the first and preferred option – EU’s coordination is essential as effective responses lie beyond the military spectrum – in what hurts Putin most – money and image.   A boycott of the Moscow World Cup seems almost inevitable. I can’t simply see England’s team playing soccer at the Luzhniki pretending business is as usual. If they leave – other’s will follow

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katalonia

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Junker

The article first published in americanthinker.com on 09/18/2017.   Commenting on Jean-Claude Junker’s state of the European Union speech last week, the usually restrained German economic weekly, Wirtschafts Woche, said the following: “Today the chief of the European Commission gave a great speech… a speech full of great nonsense.” What prompted that staid publication to use such undiplomatic language, especially since the European Parliament gave the speech a standing ovation? Hopefully, it is the realization of more and more Europeans that the cheap EU triumphalism and prescriptions peddled by Juncker are, at best, inappropriate and, at worst, a recipe for disaster.   Of triumphalism there was plenty in the speech. “The wind is back in Europe’s sails” Junker assured the audience and told it that the EU is “in the fifth year

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theresa may

  “We must be careful not to assign to this deliverance the attributes of a victory. Wars are not won by evacuations.” Winston Churchill, Speech after the evacuation of the British army at Dunkirk, 4th June, 1940   Article 50 of the TEU has been activated and the UK and the EU are entering the actual stage of Brexit negotiations and so preparing to write a new page in the history of international relations. Whatever happens in these negotiations, it will go into the textbooks because there is no precedent in history. For both parties, this is a huge quake and managing it properly is a matter of political survival. Theresa May is trying to get back on her feet after a weak and compromising performance at the recent election which she called to strengthen her support. Now

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europa

On March 25, 1957, six European countries signed the Treaty of Rome, which eventually became the European Union. The Treaty granted Europeans four basic freedoms (free movement of people, goods, capital and services) that taken together promised to take away narrow economic interests from ever again becoming the cause of the fratricidal wars that devastated Europe in the 20th century. As we celebrate the Treaty’s 60th anniversary and the longest period in European history without a major war, there is no doubt that it has been hugely successful in that particular objective.   Yet, the celebrations have been subdued to say the least, as Great Britain has now officially asked to leave the Union and doubts as to its very survival abound. What happened?   What happened in retrospect was

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EU Brexit

  The Brexit referendum held on June 23rd, 2016 dealt a severe blow to the very foundation of the European project. Focused on the Euro crisis, financial and resulting political problems in the European South and mass migration to Europe from the Middle East – which, by the way, for Europe is the Near East! – European politicians inadvertently let the European project be submerged and overtaken by national, indeed nationalist, politics.   That European elites – and even High Street punters – misjudged or underestimated the spreading wave of discontent among the diminishing and gradually impoverished middle classes, among workers left behind by deindustrialization, globalization and technological progress, among the young NEET’s, for whom free movement is associated with “people coming here and taking our jobs and benefiting from

This entry was posted in Europe and tagged , , by Ludmil Garkov.

About Ludmil Garkov

Ludmil Garkov is a finance professional with 20 years of experience in strategy and management consulting, corporate finance and M&A at Deloitte, ContourGlobal and MonuRent. He was CEO and CFO of manufacturing and construction entities in Bulgaria, as well as instructor of the Financial Modeling and Business Valuation course for the Investment Banking Institute (US). He is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), a Master in Energy and Environmental Economics and Management from the School of Higher Studies Enrico Mattei in Milan, Italy, as well as a BA in Business Administration and Political Science/International Relations from the American University in Bulgaria.
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Photo: lostbulgaria.com

Bulgarians and the British fought each other for the first time during the First World War. But in the war there was also time for relaxation in the frontline theatres. Writing about the theatres on the Balkan front, H. Collinson Owen, Official Correspondent in the Near East, emphasized the tolerance of the Bulgarians, who were just a shot away:   “All the Divisional theatres had the added spice that they were well within the enemy  artillery range – they were, in fact, the most advanced of any war theatres – and the programme contained instructions as to scattering  tactics  in case of bombardment. But the Bulgar hardly ever tried to shoot at them, and this was one of the things put down to his credit”   The Bulgarians at the

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protest_

The Brexit and “Trumpit” movements share many similarities. Both played on discomfort with globalization and immigration. They were portrayed in the media as ignorant, reactionary, and racist. Neither seemed more than minor threats at first, their leaders too inept or buffoonish to last. The very rich, the very young and the very hip generally abhorred them and still do. The more support Brexit and Trump gathered from others, the more the media emphasized their vileness and demagogy.   Between media headwinds and their own stumbles, neither Brexit nor Trumpit gained a clear majority in pre-election polls. Even their backers expected them to fail. However, closet support and disproportionate turnout provided an extra 3%, enough to push them over the top.   How? Brexit and Trumpit struck deep chords with the

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fasada4

Sorry, this entry is only available in Bulgarian.

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fuck-brexit-rally-body-image-1466935270-size_1000

Sorry, this entry is only available in Bulgarian.