Views:5354
erdogan_trump

  The presidents of the United States and Turkey are finding common ground where seemingly there is none.     There could be many reasons why Donald Trump and Recep Tayyip Erdogan are not meant to be friends. For one, the U.S. is protecting Erdogan’s archnemesis, Fethullah Gulen. Another is that Washington and Ankara have fractured relations over Turkey’s purchase of a Russian missile defense system.   Several other issues pit NATO allies Washington and Ankara against one another, though none larger at the moment than the matter of the Syrian Kurds. To Washington, the Syrian Kurds were the most trusted ally in the fight against the Islamic State. To Ankara, the Syrian Kurd military branch, the YPG, is one and the same with the PKK, which has long waged

Views:8209
syria

  Anyone who has been following the events in Syria and the region over recent years would not deny that the stalemate in the northern regions of the country is not unexpected. After more than a year of negotiations – most of them without much effect or emotion – the United States and Turkey continue to fail to resolve their differences with regard to the establishment of the so-called “buffer zone” along the Turkish-Syrian border. President Recep Erdogan has repeatedly stressed that his country intends to intervene in northern and north-eastern Syria to secure its territory from possible penetration by PKK forces, currently part of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a Washington-backed coalition. The latest threats for an offensive came just as Ambassador James Jeffrey was visiting Ankara to hold talks

This entry was posted in The Region and tagged , , , , , , by Ruslan Trad.

About Ruslan Trad

Ruslan Trad is an analyst, author and freelance journalist, focusing on the Middle East and North Africa. He was a lecturer at the Sofia University, the New Bulgaria University, the Diplomatic Institute of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and NATO. He has published reports from Lebanon, Southeast Turkey, Tunisia, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Thailand. In 2014 he made a documentary in Iraqi Kurdistan on the front lines of the war with Islamic State. In 2016 he shot a film in Tunisia about the political crisis in the country and the war in Libya. In 2017 his book "The killing of a revolution" about the war in Syria was published. He is the co-founder of De Re Militari, a journal about military conflicts. His works have been published in Bulgaria and abroad. In late 2019 he will publish his second book on Russian mercenaries, co-authored with Kiril Avramov.
Views:2489
putin-erdogan

Sorry, this entry is only available in Bulgarian.

Views:3616
xenophobia

  The wave of migration caused by the war in Syria has challenged politicians in Europe to address properly and promptly the current problems which Europe faces today. If the people in Europe can’t see in the deeds of their representatives an adequate response to today’s problems, it is very likely that those politicians are going to lose their elections and, as a consequence, Europe will fall into the hands of a new generation of leaders who may question the integrative European model altogether. The fears of the European people are understandable, but they are additionally fueled by populist parties which obviously think that they would profit from this fear and gain much greater numbers of votes. Against this background, there is a serious and visible problem: the rift between words

Views:6618
aleppo

US-Russian disagreements are not the only reason for the failure of the discussions on the Syrian crisis at the Security Council and within the International Syria Support Group, held in New York during the United Nations September session. Apart from these disagreements the conflict is complicated by the huge differences in the positions and behavior of local, regional and international forces which are involved one way or another. Accordingly, there are discrepancies in the practical steps and priorities included in their policies. As for the Russian-American contradictions, they have strategic military and political dimensions as they reflect well-established stereotypes in assessing the opponent. Washington considers Russia a regional, not a great power and emphatically places it in the hostile camp. For its part Moscow sees itself as a great power