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europa

On March 25, 1957, six European countries signed the Treaty of Rome, which eventually became the European Union. The Treaty granted Europeans four basic freedoms (free movement of people, goods, capital and services) that taken together promised to take away narrow economic interests from ever again becoming the cause of the fratricidal wars that devastated Europe in the 20th century. As we celebrate the Treaty’s 60th anniversary and the longest period in European history without a major war, there is no doubt that it has been hugely successful in that particular objective.   Yet, the celebrations have been subdued to say the least, as Great Britain has now officially asked to leave the Union and doubts as to its very survival abound. What happened?   What happened in retrospect was

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fasada4

Sorry, this entry is only available in Bulgarian.

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AngelaDavis

  In Bulgaria, across Europe, and around the world, the victory last November of wealthy real-estate developer Donald Trump over America’s former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton left many observers puzzled. So did the events in Washington DC on January 21, the day after President Trump’s inauguration, when thousands of protesters descended on Washington. As with the election, America’s old-line establishment media got it wrong, even though background information was readily available.   One of the keynote speakers was Angela Davis, an African American feminist with a long history of speeches before presidential elections. Few in the raucous crowd knew anything of Davis’ affection for all-white, all-male Communist dictatorships.   In 1980, Angela Davis was the vice-presidential candidate of the Communist Party USA, a wholly-owned subsidiary of

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gaz

  The new Russian pipeline projects – Nord Stream 2 and Turkish Stream – are designed to kill Ukrainian gas transit. However, there also is a collateral damage – the diversion of gas flows would significantly reduce transit volumes and hurt operators’ revenues in Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria and Austria. Keeping Ukrainian transit alive is beneficial for all parties, except contractors of Gazprom.     Revenue of Slovak Eustream is already affected by higher utilization of the OPAL pipeline capacity recently permitted by the European Commission. In early January 2017, Gazprom and European operators reported record daily volumes of Russian gas delivered by Nord Stream. The flow reached 168 million cubic meters per day (mmcmd, at +20°C) compared with the average of 126 mmcmd of the first half of December[1]. Cold

This entry was posted in Europe, The Region and tagged , , , , , , , , , by Mikhail Korchemkin.

About Mikhail Korchemkin

Dr. Mikhail Korchemkin is the founder and managing director of East European Gas Analysis, a consulting company that specializes in cost-benefit and financial analysis of natural gas projects in the former Soviet Union. His previous experience includes performing numerous feasibility studies for the USSR Gas Ministry, predecessor of Gazprom. Prior to going into full-time consulting Mikhail taught at the University of Pennsylvania. He has also had visiting scholarships at Harvard University and Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Mikhail has consulted numerous corporate and governmental clients including ABN-AMRO Bank, Amoco, BP, British Gas, Chevron, Conoco, Ernst & Young, ExxonMobil, Gas Strategies, Gasunie, Neste Oy, Osaka Gas, OTA of the U.S. Congress, Ruhrgas, Shell, Statoil , Swedegas, Total, Vattenfall and The World Bank. He has acted as expert witness in arbitration cases concerning natural gas business in Russia and Eastern Europe.
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Photo: @PartiaZmianaPL

  In recent months in almost all countries in Central and Eastern Europe, Russian networks of influence have come under heavy public scrutiny. Moscow’s networks of influence in many ways fit into one and the same pattern, albeit with some national specifics.   The main differences reflect the mix of state and non-state actors recruited by the Russian side through official and semi-official channels, including diplomatic channels, governmental institutions, oligarch-led business networks, media, the Orthodox church, intelligence services — the foreign intelligence service and its his civilian offshoots and the military intelligence agency, GRU — and cultural and information channels. The degree and nature of participation of indigenous sources — political parties, media, individual politicians and companies — also affect the varying natures of Russian networks of influence.   Where

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jb-march-2012-1

  Following the US elections, the Brexit vote, and the rise of non-conventional parties throughout Europe, the populist wave is sweeping both sides of the Atlantic. Populism is a revolutionary movement, but unlike its 20th century predecessors, such as communism or fascism, it eschews violent rebellion and favors a democratic replacement of incumbent governments.   Traditional and mainstream political parties need to learn lessons from the rise of populism rather than simply condemning the phenomenon and bemoaning their election losses. Ultimately, populism can contribute to democratic development by exposing the fissures, frustrations, and failures in Western societies, by involving new players in the political process, by reconnecting politicians with the populace, and by energizing the electorate to view politics as the responsibility of every citizen.   In its essence, populism

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gasprom

The contours of the leaked decision of the EC following Commissioner Vestager’s meetings with top managers of Gazprom and Russia’s deputy minister of energy spells new peaks of national energy egotism in the European Union.   At the end of October, news broke of another Gazprom-friendly EC decision to free up to 80 percent of the capacity of the Opal pipeline, which connects the Nord Stream pipeline from Germany to Czechia. More than 10 billion cubic meters of natural gas will be added to the current Opal volumes, which in turn will have to be deducted from the transit flows in the Yamal pipelines in Poland and the gas transit system of Ukraine. Benefits and income generated so far in Eastern Europe will be shifted westwards to Germany and Western Europe,

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putin_tramp

  America is entering an unpredictable and potentially volatile new era. After his inauguration as US President on January 20, Donald Trump will face enormous domestic and foreign policy challenges following an election that has sharply divided the population and disturbed many of America’s allies.   The state that stands to gain the most from a Donald Trump presidency is Vladimir Putin’s Russia. But reality may not be all it appears, as political office does not always mirror election campaigns and actual policies may not reflect pledges trumpeted at rallies.   During the long election campaign Trump periodically praised President Vladimir Putin as a great leader, he described NATO as obsolete, and complained about the Allies, while some of his foreign policy advisors have maintained close business and personal links

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Снимка: vestikavkaza.ru

  Two weeks ago an event took place at the posh offices of a prominent Washington law firm with an incredible view of the nearby White House. But the discussion had little to do with U.S. presidential politics. Hosted by the America-Georgia Business Council, the high-powered conference focused on a single subject: the strategic impact of the Chinese New Silk Road project on the economies and geopolitics of Georgia, Central Asia and Eastern Europe. Assembled for the conference was group of prominent American and foreign scholars and government officials led by the distinguished American historian on Central Asia and the Caucasus, S. Frederick Starr; geopolitical guru S. Enders Wimbush; the head of Georgia’s central bank, Koba Gvenetadze; and key officials of British Petroleum (BP), the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC),

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krutikhin-2

  BulgariaAnalytica organized the first public meeting on the topic “Geopolitical and Geoenergy Dilemmas in the Intermarium Region – the US, EU and Russian Agendas,” which was held on September 21 in Sofia.   You can watch a recording of the lecture of Mikhail Krutikhin “RUSSIAN ENERGY POLICY REGARDING THE BALKANS, TURKEY AND EASTERN EUROPE”. Mikhail Krutikhin (Russia)  – analyst and consultant on the oil and gas industry and politics in Russia; co-founder of and analyst with the RusEnergy consultancy in Moscow.   Video: