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epa05761375 The newly appointed leader of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) and candidate for chancellor, Martin Schulz, addresses the media during a news conference at the SPD's headquarters in Berlin, Germany, 30 January 2017. Seen in background (R) is a statue of former SPD party leader and Social Democratic Chancellor Willy Brandt.  EPA/CLEMENS BILAN

  German Socialists have lately been in the throes of two very socialist contradictions that help explain why they are likely to lose in the forthcoming parliamentary elections.   The left-wing violence that accompanied the recent G-20 meeting in Hamburg shocked Germans, who had come to expect their young people to focus on their studies, jobs, and careers, but it also unleashed a debate about the degree to which the violence may be characterized as left-wing. Conservatives asserted that German socialists had too long given priority to right-wing violence and thereby enabled left-wingers to mobilize for the Hamburg meeting undeterred. Many socialists argued that the left and violence are incompatible. Some intellectuals tried to find a middle ground by suggesting that left and right were anachronistic terms.   In fact,