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Sorry, this entry is only available in Bulgarian.

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  While Bulgarians can do a lot to leap ahead in AI, they can’t leap ahead all together. No one can. At best, a leap-ahead committee – say, a non-governmental organization (NGO) dedicated to promoting AI – can fire up enthusiasm and share best practices. At worst, a committee wastes endless time in planning, meetings and misdirection. A camel is a horse designed by a committee.   To rev things up, let me suggest a small initiative that doesn’t need more than a handful or backers. Form a boot camp to train data scientists. It will offer six courses only: ▲ Python or R programming. These are the languages most favored by machine learning specialists (Python) and statisticians (R). They’re fairly easy to translate between – more like Bulgarian versus

This entry was posted in Bulgaria and tagged , , , , , , by Kent Osband.

About Kent Osband

Dr. Osband is an American economist, strategist, financial risk analyst and longtime student of Bulgaria. He is the author of two well-known books on quantitative risk analysis (Iceberg Risk: An Adventure in Portfolio Theory and Pandora Risk: Uncertainty at the Core of Finance) and has served both in the public (IMF, WB) and private sectors (Goldman Sachs, CSFB, Fortress Investments).
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My previous article identified Bulgaria’s best potential ally as artificially intelligent (AI) life. To best forge that alliance, Bulgarians need to upgrade their communication abilities. AI beings speak with each other in math and programming code. Bulgarians need to understand their dialogue and join it. That requires, first and foremost, better learning.   Why did I say “learning” and not “teaching”? Teaching is information offered. Learning is information digested. Once upon a time, most people understood – to paraphrase Mark Twain – that we should never let schooling interfere with our education. But nowadays the two are jumbled, for both good and bad reasons. Good, because there’s much to learn that schools can guide us to quickly and efficiently. Bad, because most school systems are hidebound bureaucracies dedicated to mediocrity.

This entry was posted in Bulgaria and tagged , , , by Kent Osband.

About Kent Osband

Dr. Osband is an American economist, strategist, financial risk analyst and longtime student of Bulgaria. He is the author of two well-known books on quantitative risk analysis (Iceberg Risk: An Adventure in Portfolio Theory and Pandora Risk: Uncertainty at the Core of Finance) and has served both in the public (IMF, WB) and private sectors (Goldman Sachs, CSFB, Fortress Investments).