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katalonia

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Erdogan SPQR_

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Снимка: Twitter-акаунт на Ердоган

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Erdogan SPQR_

      Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan cemented his control over Turkey Sunday, establishing a new political order out of the chaos that has gripped the country over the last couple of years.   With a narrow victory in Turkey’s constitutional referendum, Erdogan will now become head of government, in addition to being head of state. He will have the legal ground to rule largely by executive decree, something he has already been doing under a state of emergency.   Erdogan also said he plans to parlay Sunday’s victory into a referendum on bringing back the death penalty. Additionally, if twice reelected as president, Erdogan could serve as Turkey’s executive leader until 2029.   On Sunday, Erdogan’s “yes” campaign received about 51.4% of the vote. The “no” campaign received

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Photo: instagram.com/rterdogan/

  The article first published in americanthinker.com on 04/16/2017.   On April 17, the Western world would wake up having to answer the urgent question: “Who lost Turkey? The day before that, Turkey would have completed its shocking transition from a long-term NATO ally and an imperfect democracy,  into an Islamist dictatorship that threatens the West and peace in the Middle East more than any other state actor, Russia included. There will be many answers, excuses and justifications for this sad state of affairs, but what’s not at issue is that Turkey is lost, perhaps for a long time, as a friend of the West.   In the run up to the Turkish referendum on the 16th there are still many pundits in the West who continue arguing that Turkey could

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Снимка: Twitter-акаунт на Ердоган

  Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is closing in on capturing the executive presidency he has long desired and codifying it in law with a new constitution. But, whether or not Erdogan emerges victorious in Turkey’s upcoming constitutional referendum, the country will still be faced with critical issues that could prolong its destabilization.   Sometime in April, Turkish voters are expected to go to the polls in a referendum calling for transforming Turkey’s government from a parliamentary system to a presidential regime. The referendum proposes eliminating the prime minister’s post and establishing an executive presidency in which the president can maintain ties to a political party.   Erdogan could remain in power until 2029 if the referendum passes. If that is the case, Turkey will likely become more autocratic and

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izb

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italia

(“Let the consuls see to it that the state suffers no harm”) These are the first words from the phrase with which the Roman senate gave the consuls dictatorial power at critical moments for the country.   As of 4th December Italy will need its consuls once again, as the country is about to enter into a political crisis, at a time when there is desperate need to have a government in place.   Italy is a democratic parliamentary republic with a multi-party system under the Constitution, in force since January 1st, 1948.   The main legislative body in Italy is a bi-cameral parliament with some limited legislative powers also held by the Council of Ministers. Every law must obtain the approval of both chambers – the Chamber of Deputies, comprised of 630

This entry was posted in Europe and tagged , , , , , , by Pavel Bandilov.

About Pavel Bandilov

Pavel Bandilov is a financial analyst with more than 15 years of capital markets experience. He has worked for leading investment intermediaries in Bulgaria. Author of “Borsite” blog and market commentator in tv program, “The Day with Veselin Dremdjiev”. Currently, he is a part of the team of “Sofia International Securities”, an investment intermediary with focus on asset management and international markets.
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eurozone_crisis

  This morning, as Italians go to the polls to vote in a constitutional referendum, European TV channels broadcast a special programme going to the root of the referendum – Italy’s banking crisis.   A series of senior bankers, chairmen and chief executives expressed their views.  None were optimistic.   The head of Societe Generale in Italy offered the view that there is no point recapitalising banks who have no realistic hope of making any profits.  Another said effectively that non-performing loans (NPLs) were bad, but the threats facing Italian banks from non bank lenders and technological developments were much worse.  Yet a third conceded that Italy should have copied Spain and applied for a bailout from the European Stability Mechanism (unfunded bailout fund).   Then the young interviewer met with Prime

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fasada4

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