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Пребиваването в страната вече е комодизирано в Гърция. Ще се случи ли същото и с гражданството?

  Putting citizenship up for sale is a controversial endeavor.   Some natural-born citizens of a country might revolt against the idea of wealthy foreign investors purchasing what is essentially their birthright. Others may be opposed to the possibility of Chinese or nationals of another state pouring into their own country. There are also geopolitical risks to weigh when a country implements a citizenship by investment (CBI) program.   Some existing CBI programs, for instance, have lured Russian oligarchs. Notably, aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, purchased Cypriot, and hence EU, citizenship through the CBI program in Cyprus.   Reuters reported earlier this month that Iranian nationals are making use of Turkey’s recently revamped economic citizenship program to dodge U.S. sanctions.   Additionally, there are

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lodkite

  The offshore business, investment and banking world, at times, carries a pretty bad rap in Eastern Europe. Often when people think of going offshore, what comes to mind is corrupt officials siphoning off public funds, then moving their assets to international tax havens and secret bank accounts.   But Eastern European states themselves are havens for business and capital, as well as immigrant investors. With relatively low taxes across the region and low costs of living and labor, Eastern Europe already attracts entrepreneurs, investors and expatriates looking to relocate their businesses, capital and/or themselves to greener pastures.   The lure of Eastern Europe for the nomad capitalist   “I think Eastern Europe is a great place,” global citizenship expert Andrew Henderson said in an interview with Bulgaria Analytica on

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lng_vessel

The article first published in instituteforenergyresearch.org on 12/14/2018.   On Oct. 17, 2018, Poland’s largest energy company PGNiG signed a contract with two American LNG companies to deliver up to 1 million tons of gas each over the next 20 years. It is the first large U.S. LNG contract in Eastern Europe, and it won’t be the last. Indeed, it is very likely that American LNG companies will become major suppliers to Eastern Europe in the near future.   There are a number of reasons for this, both politically and economically. It is, of course, well-known that oil and gas exports, and particularly the latter, have long been used by Russian rulers as political weapons to achieve specific policy objectives—more often than not directed against Western interests. So none of this

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Aleksandr-Solzhenitsyn

The article first published in americanthinker.com on 12/11/2018.     The 100th anniversary of possibly the greatest writer of the tortured 20th century has predictably and justly given rise to numerous encomiums such as this one from one of the great man’s best interpreters. There is no doubt that Solzhenitsyn, if not St. John, to whom he has been compared, in his epochal struggle with communist totalitarianism, at the very least drove a key nail in the coffin of communist inhumanity. What he did without any doubt was to open the eyes of the West to the reality of the murderous Stalinist regime in the Soviet Union, but also in Eastern Europe, China and wherever communism had triumphed. And expose it he did in all of its genocidal fury, the Left’s unwillingness

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donald-trump

  ‘Fort Trump’ said the Polish president Andrzej Duda, during a White House press conference last week, would be an appropriate name to call the first American military base in Poland. Whether this Polish dream comes to pass or not is yet to be seen, but the strategic rationale behind it is anything but the joke US pundits took it to be.  It is, in fact, an incapsulation of the dilemma facing Eastern Europe and with it, NATO and the United States.   For barely concealed behind it is a multitude of challenges that must be addressed without delay if a serious crisis in Europe and the alliance is to be avoided. At the bottom of it is the seemingly unavoidable conflict over Muslim immigration. Virtually all of Eastern Europe

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Photo: Screenshot/PAP video

The article first published in americanthinker.com on 06/18/2018.   As Trump haters are having yet another field day on account of his ostensible faux pas at the G-7 meeting in Canada and leftist pundits fall over each other screaming that Trump has no strategic vision, as others just as self-assuredly accuse him of planning to “break the West,” which, on the face of it, requires  plenty of strategic vision. While this silliness continues to rapidly declining effect, there are now signs that the White House is putting together a robust strategy in Europe that was missing until now.   It comes in the shape of A. Wess Mitchell, who was just appointed the point man at the State Department for Europe and Eurasia. The significance of this appointment, which was missed in

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Ukraine’s Ethnic Groups

  On July 10, 2017, Ukraine adopted new regulations for border crossings. They require all Russian citizens entering the country to have biometric passports and “register with their temporary addresses and inform authorities about their movement within Ukrainian territory”. Moscow’s official reaction was predictably negative, threatening to introduce a visa regime for Ukrainians. This could potentially bring further complications to over a million Ukrainians working in Russia and an additional several million who annually cross the border to visit their friends and relatives.   While Ukraine had the world’s attention, primarily due to its political turmoil and Russia’s “hybrid aggression”, the country’s demography is and will continue to be its most serious challenge. This Eastern European country has a progressively shrinking population due to emigration and birthrate decline. As a

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xenophobia

  Xenophobia – the fear of foreigners – has always been a serious problem for humanity. In the EU today, however, it is outweighed by xeno-xenophobia – the fear of the fear of foreigners. European elites, eager to promote ever-greater union and reap more of the benefits of globalization, decry their citizens’ ambivalence on immigration. Unlike Hillary Clinton, they don’t openly describe a quarter of their populations as despicable, irredeemable haters. Yet, European elites are even more fearful of public hate boiling up and exploding. They see the ghosts of 20th century fascism and world wars.   Unfortunately, the public has cause for ambivalence. On the one hand, it revels in an unprecedented combination of peace, advanced technology, economic prosperity, and cradle-to-grave protections. On the other hand, that combination is

This entry was posted in Europe and tagged , , , , , by Kent Osband.

About Kent Osband

Dr. Osband is an American economist, strategist, financial risk analyst and longtime student of Bulgaria. He is the author of two well-known books on quantitative risk analysis (Iceberg Risk: An Adventure in Portfolio Theory and Pandora Risk: Uncertainty at the Core of Finance) and has served both in the public (IMF, WB) and private sectors (Goldman Sachs, CSFB, Fortress Investments).
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ts

  President Erdogan’s radical departure from previous policy lines toward the Kurdish minority and its political representatives in the Turkish Parliament could derail Turkey’s ambitious plans to act as a crucial energy hub for gas and oil flows destined to the EU and global market.   He is not only fighting the PKK but all Kurds, as HDP co-leader Selahattin Demirtaş was arrested along with at least 11 MPs in a marked escalation of the post-coup crackdown.   Intensification of the government’s war against Kurds in the southeastern region of the country might spell the end of a risk-free environment for all major transit projects passing through Turkey — both existing and planned.   A sequence of bombs blasts — the last one two weeks ago on the gas line

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putin-erdogan

  Following President Putin’s trip to Turkey and a sequence of publicity stunts, some of them jointly with President Erdogan, it has become clear that the Russian leader is engaging in another game of poker politics in a desperate attempt to make headlines, impress the international audience and sell more gas to Europe, bypassing EU directives and concurrently Ukraine. Although most of his plan is a deja vu, the decision to proceed with the intergovernmental agreement on Turkish stream and start maneuvers on the gas front from Istanbul contains a piece of novelty.   Most of the background remains the same – intentions, plans for the future, verbal rather than real streams – but the new moments are worth noting. Russia has changed several key elements in its approach to the ‘streams’ issue.