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Пребиваването в страната вече е комодизирано в Гърция. Ще се случи ли същото и с гражданството?

  Putting citizenship up for sale is a controversial endeavor.   Some natural-born citizens of a country might revolt against the idea of wealthy foreign investors purchasing what is essentially their birthright. Others may be opposed to the possibility of Chinese or nationals of another state pouring into their own country. There are also geopolitical risks to weigh when a country implements a citizenship by investment (CBI) program.   Some existing CBI programs, for instance, have lured Russian oligarchs. Notably, aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, purchased Cypriot, and hence EU, citizenship through the CBI program in Cyprus.   Reuters reported earlier this month that Iranian nationals are making use of Turkey’s recently revamped economic citizenship program to dodge U.S. sanctions.   Additionally, there are

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lodkite

  The offshore business, investment and banking world, at times, carries a pretty bad rap in Eastern Europe. Often when people think of going offshore, what comes to mind is corrupt officials siphoning off public funds, then moving their assets to international tax havens and secret bank accounts.   But Eastern European states themselves are havens for business and capital, as well as immigrant investors. With relatively low taxes across the region and low costs of living and labor, Eastern Europe already attracts entrepreneurs, investors and expatriates looking to relocate their businesses, capital and/or themselves to greener pastures.   The lure of Eastern Europe for the nomad capitalist   “I think Eastern Europe is a great place,” global citizenship expert Andrew Henderson said in an interview with Bulgaria Analytica on

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  John J. Mearsheimer and Stephen M. Walt make a powerful case for offshore balancing as a grand strategy for the United States, but, when it comes to Russia and Europe, they refuse to draw the logical consequences of their own framework. As a result, their analysis implodes.   Here’s how Mearsheimer and Walt define offshore balancing: Washington would forgo ambitious efforts to remake other societies and concentrate on what really matters: pre­serving U.S. dominance in the Western Hemisphere and countering potential hegemons in Europe, Northeast Asia, and the Persian Gulf. Instead of policing the world, the United States would encourage other countries to take the lead in checking rising powers, intervening itself only when necessary.   “How would it work?” they ask. Here’s the answer: the United States should