russia europa

  The Eurozone effect   Bulgaria’s entry into NATO is not a betrayal to Russia, but its continued membership is Alexander Dugin Intellectual guru of Russia’s Euro-Asian doctrine   Let’s consider the reference to the Russian threat when achieving the other key goal of Bulgarian foreign and monetary policy – membership in the Eurozone.   The metrics of the accession-ready status are not just embodied in a set of formal criteria but reflect a generic reference to key system indicators, including the resilience of the economy to external shocks, the ability to sustain high growth and wealth generation rates; capability of institutions to provide efficient governance, mitigate risks and stick to obligations; and capacity of citizens to profit from rights, opportunities and cope with the challenges of “life in the

photo round table

  A gap exists in Russian politics, former opposition politician and energy expert Vladimir Milov said at a round table discussion in Sofia, Bulgaria. According to Milov, the Vladimir Putin regime is straddling a gap between the administration’s desire to focus on geopolitical conflicts and the demands of the Russian people to address deteriorating economic conditions.   “That gap is really what matters right now in Russian politics,” Milov said. “There is no such thing as a forever in Russian politics.”   The Oct. 2 event, hosted by Bulgaria Analytica and the Center for Balkan and Black Sea Studies, featured Milov and doctoral student Yulia Zhuchkova on a panel alongside Bulgarian experts on energy and geopolitics, Vasko Nachev, Alex Alexiev and Ilian Vassilev. Zhuchkova followed Milov’s speech with a breakdown

stalin putin

  He, who speaks of Russia as a threat to Bulgaria is a complete idiot Alexander Dugin   Relations between Bulgaria and Russia go beyond the format of standard bilateral relations. The Kremlin rarely relies on the services of its embassy in Sofia or its diplomacy in order to realize its plans, as it has at its disposal sufficient local alternatives in Bulgarian proxies – parties, organizations and politicians.   As Russian opposition politician, Boris Nemtsov’s partner and Alexei Navalny’s adviser, Vladimir Milov, said: “Putin wants to colonize you and your elite helps him.” Succinct and clear.   A detailed debate on the “Russian threat”, which appeared as a standard text in a report by the Bulgarian secret services, never happened. “The Sound Forces”, including the defense minister (!?), promised


  On September 22, 2017, Sberbank CEO, Herman Gref, announced the state-owned Russian bank plans to withdraw from several European countries. The reason given was pressure from sanctions. According to Gref, “…it is extremely challenging to work under sanctions in Europe.” Under existing European sanctions passed in 2014, Sberbank is barred from raising debt of more than 30 days’ maturity in Europe. The US recently tightened this limit from 30 to 14 days, in response to Russia’s illegal involvement in last year’s presidential election. Mr. Gref did not reveal which countries Sberbank plans to leave or what it plans for its offices there. However, it looks like the “exodus” has already started: in 2017, Sberbank has sold it banking institution in Slovenia and is trying to sell two Ukrainian subsidiaries


  The news from Ankara these days ascertain an important segment in President Erdogan’s drive for global prominence as he is borrowing heavily from President Putin’s guide for autocratic leaders. Yet it is hard to see how he will be able to profit from the Kremlin’s recipes, lacking the tsar’s resources and insatiable pool of social patience.   Russia has been seeking to build on the rifts within NATO and US-Turkish relations by enticing Erdogan into a pool of geopolitical tradeoffs and gambles.   Putin’s attempts to undermine the EU and the US are persisting. The chance to help Turkey steer away from NATO’s mainstream and turn into its weakest element seems up for grabs.   President Putin is visiting Turkey this week to talk over a new strategic framework


  Despite all the might of the US Congress and its ability to block Trump’s move on Russia, the legislative branch still has no executive powers – it can hardly initiate or implement any proactive or preventive policy to secure America’s and the West’s perimeter for independent policies against Russia. The White House is overcommitted to reassuring Trump’s survival in the Russia-gate affair and the investigation kernel is still ahead. The focus on shielding individual members of the Trump family during the investigation, as well as the chaotic cadres’ changes in the White House, are not exactly a mark of the US president’s strength, capacity to lead and change the world.   Putin can further speculate on the disagreements in transatlantic relations, which does not imply immediate enthusiasm and capacity

epa05761375 The newly appointed leader of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) and candidate for chancellor, Martin Schulz, addresses the media during a news conference at the SPD's headquarters in Berlin, Germany, 30 January 2017. Seen in background (R) is a statue of former SPD party leader and Social Democratic Chancellor Willy Brandt.  EPA/CLEMENS BILAN

  German Socialists have lately been in the throes of two very socialist contradictions that help explain why they are likely to lose in the forthcoming parliamentary elections.   The left-wing violence that accompanied the recent G-20 meeting in Hamburg shocked Germans, who had come to expect their young people to focus on their studies, jobs, and careers, but it also unleashed a debate about the degree to which the violence may be characterized as left-wing. Conservatives asserted that German socialists had too long given priority to right-wing violence and thereby enabled left-wingers to mobilize for the Hamburg meeting undeterred. Many socialists argued that the left and violence are incompatible. Some intellectuals tried to find a middle ground by suggesting that left and right were anachronistic terms.   In fact,

Russia flag. has written twice before (Alex Alexiev and Enders Wimbush, Russia in Decline) about this study and is  returning to the subject again now that the results of the study have been published in a book, which may well be the most important book on Russia since Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999.[1]   The book is the result of a collective effort by eighteen prominent American and Russian political analysts and economists assembled by the Jamestown Foundation for the purpose of assessing the state of Russia in 2016, the 17th year of the Putin’s de facto leadership era in Russia. The verdict of the experts is essentially unanimous, Russia today is in a state of “a serious and sustained decline.” What that decline augurs for the future

Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani

When the „First Funding Conference of Coordinate Council of the Russian Compatriots of the State of Qatar” took place in Doha in October 2016, some observers were surprised to find out that it represented 7,000 Russian nationals permanently residing in Qatar. According to the Russian embassy in Doha, these include “physicians, engineers, sports coaches, pilots, musicians of the Qatari Philharmonic Orchestra and etc.”( “etc.” most likely also includes SVR/GRU operatives). This is an impressive number for a country of less than 2 million, particularly since the last such figures given by the Russian embassy in 2014 were only 2,500 people. This dramatic, almost 300%, growth has been directly related to the new rapprochement between the two countries, which started in 2016 following the visit to Moscow of Qatar’s emir Tamim

The aircraft that was shot down over Ukraine in July 2014 - Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

  Moscow is not a reliable partner for Washington in combating international terrorism. On the contrary, the Kremlin supports forces in the Middle East and elsewhere that oppose the US. It aims to deflect violent jihadism toward the West both to shield Russia from being targeted and to weaken America’s global influence. Vladimir Putin’s Russia possesses all the attributes of a terrorist sponsor, by engaging in terrorist attacks against its own population and playing a significant role in developing terrorist networks outside its borders. Russia’s security services have engaged in domestic terrorism both to subdue and manipulate public opinion. The most notorious outrage occurred in September 1999 shortly before Putin was appointed President. John Dunlop, a distinguished scholar at the Hoover Institution, in his landmark book The Moscow Bombings of